Physically Fit vs. Physically Competent: MovNat Proves There’s a BIG Difference!

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Most physical trainers and fitness instructors show you how to become “physically fit,” but MovNat founder Erwan Le Corre is teaching people all over the globe how to develop physical competency for the real world.

I know what you’re thinking. “What’s the difference,” right? That may sound like a load of mumbo-jumbo, but theres a lot more to your body than what meets the eye. MovNat programs and training techniques go beyond the basic conventions of getting in shape. Using a variety of natural movements, Le Corree shows his clients how to move and how to perform physically in ways that are adaptable and applicable to real life!

Physical competency is the ability to respond to the physical demand of the real world. Le Corre and his successors think everyone should possess the ability to help themselves and help others as needed. Instead of gym-contained exercises, Le Corre’s program breaks the modern fitness mold to show people how to meet the demands of the real world.

These demands are contextual, of course. Some people may go their entire lives without a need for a heightened physical competency, but all of Le Corre’s clients praise him for introducing them to a new way of thinking. The fact of the matter is, any given situation

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or environment can be physically demanding. It could be as simple as moving a piece of furniture into your new home, jumping over a fence to get away from a viscous canine, or climbing into a window when you’ve locked yourself out of the house.

As read on MovNat’s website,

“We are not meant to live in a confined environment. We are not meant to be disconnected from the natural world and our own true nature. Chronic pain, immobility, depression and lack of vitality, these are the symptoms of the zoo human syndrome. Modern society conditions us to consider this as normal and unavoidable.” 

Le Corre started this fitness jouney back in 2007. His interest in natural movement was sparked for three reasons in particular:

1. He wanted to do something he enjoyed to do,

2. He saw that something essential was missing in the field of the fitness industry and physical education.

Mainly, he realized that structured fitness systems aren’t equipping people with the necessary skills to survive against extraneous circumstances. “Day to day situations, the occasional life threatening situation may demand a physical response from you, no matter the size of your muscles,” said Le Corre. After he made the decision to work in the field professionally, he started company in 2009 to teach people how to move and how to perform physically in ways that are both adaptable and applicable to real life.

Utilizing natural movement workouts helps condition your body. You’ll appreciate having the strength, power and endurance to carry something over a distance much more that being able to perfect a pull-up.

“It’s essential in life to be equipped with fundamental skills, even with fitness,” said Le Corre. “Just like reading and writing or knowing how to make basic mental calculations. Every adult should be able to do that.”

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Unspecialized workouts embrace the variety of your body’s patterns. Movement should be able to be modified by an evolution of the enviornment or change in situation. Instead of simply jumping for joy on your Plyo Box, think about the jump before hand. What if the obstacle was slightly different? How would you modify the jump if the box were further? Closer? Higher? Shorter? The motions have to be practical so that you’re able understand the nature and value of the movement.

When you use the same conventional equipment, you’re simply doing the same thing over and over again. “Kettle bells are great, but so are human bodies, medicine balls, rocks, logs, olympic bars, dogs, or cats,” say Le Corre. “The point is, for physical competency in real life, you can’t set any expectations. You need to be ready for any and everything, and the best way to do that is to train in diverse environments to prepare yourself to make those adjustments in movement.”